Taking an environmentally sensitive approach to pest management


Integrated Pest & Crop Management



AUTHOR

Wayne C. Bailey
University of Missouri
Division of Plant Sciences
(573) 882-2838
baileyw@missouri.edu

Stinkbug Numbers Elevated in Missouri

Wayne C. Bailey
University of Missouri
(573) 882-2838
baileyw@missouri.edu

Published: June 20, 2011

Captures of green stinkbug and the two brown stinkbug species are greatly elevated at this time in 2011. Green stinkbug captures in blacklight traps in Central Missouri are 6-10 times higher than in the past 25 years. Usually green stinkbug will be captured at rates of less than 10 daily, but at present, numbers approaching 60 to 100 have been found daily for the past 2 1/2 weeks. Sweep samples taken from field borders and waterways show that these three species of stinkbugs can be readily found at number much higher than normal.

Both species of brown stinkbug often attack seedling corn, although the numbers of damaged fields reported this spring remain low. Possibly these insects are remaining in field border vegetation, which has remained green following numerous spring rains. Brown stinkbugs can damage corn at the emergence to small seedling stage and again during the time of ear development. Although we probably avoided heavy infestations and damage by brown stinkbug on seedling corn this spring, producers are encouraged to scout fields during ear formation to determine if brown stinkbugs are actively feeding. Stinkbug damage during corn ear development usually occurs when stinkbugs feed on the underside of developing ears where damage from their piercing-sucking mouthparts diminish the expansion of kernels, resulting in "drooping" corn ears.

Green stinkbug generally attacks soybean during the reproductive stages of growth. They damage plants when they repeatedly feed on plant stems, leaflets and pods. This type of heavy feeding during the reproductive stages of plant growth can result in "delayed senescence". Plants with heavy stinkbug feeding remain green for 2 - 3 weeks after plants without heavy feeding have dried for harvest. Green stinkbug populations typically begin on the field edge and spread into the soybean field interior as populations grow through the summer. Producers are encouraged to scout soybean fields on a weekly schedule to determine the presence of stinkbugs and other soybean insect pests.

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REVISED: October 11, 2011