Taking an environmentally sensitive approach to pest management


Integrated Pest & Crop Management



AUTHOR

Rob Kallenbach
University of Missouri
Division of Plant Sciences
(573) 884-2213
kallenbachr@missouri.edu

Forage of the Month: Brassica species

Rob Kallenbach
University of Missouri
(573) 884-2213
kallenbachr@missouri.edu

Published: October 4, 2012

Brassica species such as turnip, rape, swede, tyfon and kale are not widely grown in Missouri but can furnish good quality forage in late fall and early winter. If planted in late summer, these drought-tolerant plants can provide up to 6,000 lb/acre of forage by December 1. However, because they cannot withstand repeated, severe freeze/thaw events, they cannot be expected to provide feed much beyond January 1 most years. Although forage quality of both the tops and roots is high, bloat and other animal problems can occur if Brassicas are the only feed in the diet. Brassicas do not tolerate poorly drained soils and are notorious for contracting root and crown rot diseases, especially if grown on the same field for two consecutive years. Crop rotation is about the only way to control these diseases. The turnip aphid, flea beetle, and other insects can create problems from planting through the end of September if not controlled.

collage with photos of Brassica species
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REVISED: October 1, 2015