Taking an environmentally sensitive approach to pest management


Integrated Pest & Crop Management



AUTHOR

Kevin Rice
University of Missouri
Division of Plant Sciences
(573) 882-2838
RiceKev@missouri.edu

Spider Mites

Kevin Rice
University of Missouri
(573) 882-2838
RiceKev@missouri.edu

Published: July 31, 2018

Spider mite populations increase under hot dry conditions and can cause economic damage in Missouri field crops. Several groups of insect predators effectively control spider mites. However, these natural enemies are more susceptible to insecticides, therefore, chemical control targeting early season pests such as Japanese beetles, may exasperate spider mite damage later in the season. Furthermore, imidacloprid applied as a systematic soil treatment or as a foliar spray can increase mite fecundity.

Spider mites are small (1/60 of an inch) and typically occur on the undersides of leaves making detection difficult. Identification can be accomplished using a 10-20 X hand lens. In soybean, chemical control is warranted when spider mites are present, and foliage yellowing reaches 20 % before pod set, or foliage yellowing reaches 10% after pod set. Most pesticides do not kill spider mite eggs, therefore additional applications are sometimes necessary 5 days after the initial treatment. Spider mites occur on numerous species of weeds along field borders. Weed control can reduce overwintering success and infestations in crops the following year.

   About IPM     Contact Us    Subscribe     Unsubcribe

Copyright © 2018 — Curators of the University of Missouri. All rights reserved. DMCA and other copyright information. An equal opportunity/access/affirmative action/pro-disabled and veteran employer.

Printed from: https://ipm.missouri.edu
E-mail: IPM@missouri.edu

REVISED: February 21, 2017