Taking an environmentally sensitive approach to pest management


Missouri Environment & Garden



AUTHOR

Donna Aufdenberg
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 243-3581
aufdenbergd@missouri.edu

Kate Kammler
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 883-3548
kammlerk@missouri.edu

Kathi Mecham
University of Missouri Extension
(660) 542-1792
mechamk@missouri.edu

June Gardening Tips

Donna Aufdenberg
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 243-3581
aufdenbergd@missouri.edu

Kate Kammler
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 883-3548
kammlerk@missouri.edu

Kathi Mecham
University of Missouri Extension
(660) 542-1792
mechamk@missouri.edu

Published: May 28, 2020



  • Control bagworms now while they are still small. By July, they are almost too big for treatment. Bagworms can be found on juniper, arborvitae and other evergreens. They can do a lot of damage in no time so spray before the bags get too big! For more information, see MU extension guide g7250: The Bagworm in Missouri.
  • Keep applying organic mulches such as hardwood mulches and pine needles in planting areas to conserve moisture, discourage weeds, and enrich the soil as they decay.
  • Trees and shrubs may still be fertilized before July. Fertilizing after July will lead to new growth that will not harden off by the time freezing temperatures arrive.
  • Irrigate once a week deeply so water infiltrates the soil and the roots of plants will follow it leading to drought tolerant plants. Drip irrigation or soaker hoses are best to water the ground while keeping the foliage dry to prevent diseases. 
  • Fertilize annual flowers in containers with a balanced water soluble fertilizer once a week. Follow the directions for fertilizer rate.
  • Sow seed sparingly of biennial flowers such as hollyhock and foxglove for next years bloom. Mark the area to keep from disturbing any seedlings coming up. Plan to thin seedling that are too thick. 
  • Mite activity increases with hot, dry weather. Repeat strong gets of water every couple days or release beneficial predators to help control populations.
  • Prune spring flowering shrubs after blooms have faded.

  • Scouting the vegetable garden for early detection of insect pests is essential for good control. Learn to identify and distinguish between pests and beneficial predators.  For more information, see MU extension guide IPM1028: Increasing Beneficial Insects in row Crops and Gardens.
  • As soon as cucumber and squash vines start to run, begin control methods to control cucumber beetles and squash vine borers.
  • To keep your cauliflower heads pure white, layer several of the long, outside leaves onto the flat, open head. Secure the leaves together with clothespin or two toothpicks in the form of an X until the head is ready for harvesting. You can also grow self-blanching head that don't require the pinning of the leaves.
  • Water corn at two crucial times: when the tassels at the top are beginning to show and when silks are beginning to show on the ear. 
  • Consider planting a second crop of green beans, cucumbers, and zucchini.
  • Scout the garden and remove any leaf or stem that show signs of disease and destroy it. This form of sanitation can help to prevent the spread of disease onto desired plants.  For more information, see MU extension guide g6202: Disease Prevention in Home Vegetable Gardens.
  • Plant pumpkins during mid-June. Large varieties will a need 100+ day growing season.
  • Pinch top growth on herbs to encourage new growth and branching. Keep flowers removed off plants if you plan on harvesting and drying.
  • To help prevent disease problems in the vegetable garden, avoid overhead sprinkler systems and attempt to water in the mornings. Soaker hoses and drip irrigation work best for disease management and water efficiency.
  • Scout for insect and disease problems in the garden. If you use a pesticide, follow the directions on label.

Tall fescue and/or Kentucky bluegrass

  • Start watering as needed. If no rain occurs, water infrequently to a depth of 6 inches once or twice a week. Heavy soils may need 2-3 shorter pulses of water to prevent puddling and runoff. Don't overwater, as drought stress will be much less detrimental than overwatering. Water early in the morning rather than at dusk to reduce disease occurrence.
  • Rapidly growing lawns may need frequent mowing (once a week). Taller mowing heights of 3 1/2 to 4 inches are required to enhance turf quality and reduce weed infestation.
  • Only mow if the turf is growing, so do not mow drought-stressed turf. Restrict mowing saturated or water-logged areas which may cause ruts and will increase compaction.
  • Use a mulch mower to integrate clippings. Collecting clippings will increase fertility need of lawn. Do not leave clippings on lawn surface as it will encourage disease. Rake in or mow again to incorporate clippings.
  • If fertilization is necessary, apply at a very low rate of 0.25 – 0.5 lb N per 1000 sq ft. On established lawns, focus most fertilization efforts in September and October.
  • Scout for brown patch disease and sod webworm damage and treat if necessary.
  • For more information, see MU extension guide g6705 Cool-season Grasses: Lawn Maintenance Calendar

Zoysiagrass

  • As opposed to cool-season turf, zoysiagrass lawns now need fertility as temperature and growth increase. Apply 0.5 – 1 lb N per 1000 sq ft in mid May to mid June to facilitate growth.
  • Mow zoysiagrass frequently (once a week) at 1 – 2 inches. Make sure your mower blade is sharp as zoysiagrass leaves and seedheads are quite coarse.
  • Only mow if the turf is growing, so do not mow drought-stressed turf. Restrict mowing saturated or water-logged areas which may cause ruts and will increase compaction.
  • Use a mulch mower to integrate clippings. Collecting clippings will increase fertility need of lawn. Do not leave clippings on lawn surface as it will encourage disease. Rake in or mow again to incorporate clippings.
  • Zoysiagrass is more drought tolerant than cool-season turfgrasses. Watering should not be necessary except for prolonged dry periods.
  • Scout for insect issues such as billbugs and chinch bugs which can cause turfgrass loss in summer. See Issues with Zoysiagrass Lawns for more information.
  • For more information, see MU extension guide g6706: Establishment and Care of Zoysiagrass Lawns.

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REVISED: May 28, 2020