Taking an environmentally sensitive approach to pest management


Missouri Environment & Garden



AUTHOR

Donna Aufdenberg
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 243-3581
aufdenbergd@missouri.edu

Kate Kammler
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 883-3548
kammlerk@missouri.edu

Kathi Mecham
University of Missouri Extension
(660) 542-1792
mechamk@missouri.edu

July Gardening Tips

Donna Aufdenberg
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 243-3581
aufdenbergd@missouri.edu

Kate Kammler
University of Missouri Extension
(573) 883-3548
kammlerk@missouri.edu

Kathi Mecham
University of Missouri Extension
(660) 542-1792
mechamk@missouri.edu

Published: June 29, 2020



  • Deadhead annuals and perennials especially if reseeding is not desired. Cut back foliage to encourage a tidier appearance.
  • Look for diseased foliage on roses. Practice sanitation and clean up any fallen leaves. Continue disease treatments as needed. Watch for distorted growth and abnormal looking blooms that might indicate rose rosette disease.
  • Newly planted trees and shrubs should continue to be watered thoroughly at least once a week if regular rains are not occurring.
  • Keep fertilizing annual flowers every 2 weeks to keep plants looking their best.
  • Plant zinnia, cosmos, alyssum, pansy, marigold and cleome seed by July 4th for late bloom in annual planters and borders.
  • Keep chrysanthemums pinched back until July 4th for compact shape and increased number of fall blooms.
  • Monitor trees and shrubs for Japanese beetles. Your local MU Extension Specialist can give current control recommendations. For more information visit: https://ipm.missouri.edu/pestmonitoring/jb/
  • Divide iris after bloom.
  • Enjoy beautiful bouquets of flowers from your garden!
  • Water newly planted trees and shrubs thoroughly, once a week.
  • Keep up with weeding. Do not let weeds go to seed.
  • Do not fertilize trees and shrubs after July 4th to prevent new growth that may lead to winter injury.

  • Blossom-end rot of tomato and peppers occurs when soil moisture is irregular or uneven. Take measures to ensure even soil moisture around plants.
  • Irrigate regularly during dry weather and mulch sufficiently around vegetable plants to conserve the moisture. Water at the base of plants to keep foliage dry to help prevent diseases in the garden.
  • Dig potatoes when tops die and pull onions and garlic when tops fall over and start to turn brown. Dry in a ventilated area and store in a cool, dry place. for more information, see MU Extension Guide g6226 Vegetable Harvest and Storage https://extension2.missouri.edu/g6226.
  • Make successive plantings of corn, beans, cucumbers and summer squash to be able to harvest into fall.
  • Scout for insect and disease problems in the garden. If you use a pesticide, follow the directions on label.
  • For more information about diseases in the garden, see MU extension guide g6203 Common Diseases in the Home Garden https://extension2.missouri.edu/g6203.
  • After harvesting ripe tomatoes, they can be stored between 55 to 60 degrees F up to one week. Do not store tomatoes in a refrigerator.
  • Harvest tomato heirloom varieties a couple days before peak ripeness for best quality and store in a cool area.
  • Fertilize established plantings of rhubarb and asparagus. Keep ahead of the weeds.

  • Prune out and destroy old fruiting canes of raspberries and blackberries after harvest is complete. Watch for diseased canes and plants.
  • Blackberries are starting to ripen. Get ready for picking!!
  • Scout peach trees for brown rot. A preventative spray schedule can keep disease and insects at bay. For more information, see MU extension guide g6010 Fruit Spray Schedules for the Homeowner https://extension2.missouri.edu/g6010.
  • Net grapes to protect fruit from birds.
  • A second treatment to trunks of peach trees for peach borers may be warranted.
  • To keep birds away from fruit trees, try different scare tactics like fake snakes, owls, scare crows, pie pans and wind chimes.
  • June bearing strawberries need summer care. If you have your plants in hills, pick off all runners. If you planted a matted row, encourage the runners to root and grow until the row is 2 feet wide.
  • Early season peach, pear and apple variety harvest begins.

Tall fescue and/or Kentucky bluegrass

  • Any heavy nitrogen fertilization should be restricted on cool-season lawns in July in Missouri. At most, 0.5 lb N per 1000 sq ft should be used on nitrogen starved cool-season lawns.
  • Water if needed. Water infrequently to a depth of 4-6 inches. Avoid puddles and runoff. Don't overwater, as that can promote fungal growth, as this is worse than having some drought stress. Tall fescue can undergo some drought stress and recover. For more information, see MU extension guide g6705 Cool-season Grasses: Lawn Maintenance Calendar https://extension2.missouri.edu/g6705.
  • Rapidly growing lawns need frequent mowing. Taller mowing heights of about 3 1/2 to 4 inches reduce the chance for turf scalping.
  • Scout for sod webworm damage and treat if found.
  • Mulch clippings. Only remove if they are excessive and cover the turf canopy.

Zoysiagrass

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REVISED: June 29, 2020