Taking an environmentally sensitive approach to pest management


Missouri Produce Growers



AUTHOR

Jaime Pinero
Lincoln University
(573) 681-5522
PineroJ@LincolnU.edu

Hero®: A Newly Approved Insecticide for Missouri

Jaime Pinero
Lincoln University
(573) 681-5522
PineroJ@LincolnU.edu

Published: August 1, 2011

New in the 2011 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide is Hero® (FMC Agricultural Products), a broad-spectrum insecticide that has been labeled in Missouri for use in vegetables (tomatoes, succulent peas and beans, eggplant, peppers (bell and non-bell), head lettuce, head and stem brassicas, root and tuber vegetables), nuts and vines. The active ingredients for Hero® are the pyrethroids zetacypermethrin (the same active ingredient as in Mustang) and bifenthrin (the same active ingredient as in Capture). Hero® is a new generation insecticide that provides fast knockdown and longer-last control of many insect pests and several types of mites. Mites are often problematic during dry and hot periods; Hero® can be considered as a control option. [Other miticide choices that are effective on spider mites, but do not control other insect pests, are abamectin (Agri-Mek; Epi-Mek), bifenazate (Acramite), spiromesifen (Oberon) and wettable sulfur.]

Leaf stipuling or 'flecking' is a typical symptom of spider mite problems.

An enlarged picture of the two spotted spider mite, our most common mite pest. They can be seen with the aide of a 10x hand lens.

Hero® is a restricted-use pesticide and therefore growers interested in using it need to have a pesticide applicator license. Pre-harvest intervals are 3 days for cucurbit crops and 1 day for tomatoes. Consult the label for more information including the rates of application for the insect to be controlled, as well as for precautions and restrictions. Hero® holds the signal word ‘caution’. Always follow all the label directions carefully and wear protective clothing during mixing and application.

The description of the above product is for informational purposes only. No discrimination is intended and no endorsement by Lincoln University Cooperative Extension is implied. Remember, as part of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program, pesticides are the last line of defense against insect pests and diseases. Pesticides should only be used when other preventive tactics have failed to contain pest injury to acceptable levels, when reasonably certain that a benefit will result from a pesticide application (e.g., when pest population/incidence has reached a threshold level). Pesticides should used in the best way possible to minimize associated risks. Always choose pesticides by evaluating their efficacy, cost, toxicity, persistence, and environmental effects.

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REVISED: December 1, 2015